TED - 要多久就能學會新事務 - 20小時 The first 20 hours - how to learn anything

TED - 要多久就能學會新事務 - 20小時 The first 20 hours -- how to learn anything

TED 演講 - 完整播放清單 : http://bit.ly/TED-tw
精通一件事到達專業等級, 要 一萬小時, 但到底需要多久 我們才能由入門的階段進入到熟悉的階段,由入門階段進入熟悉階段會有一個進入障礙, 所以至少要練習 20 個小時才能打破這個障礙。
 
喬許 - 考夫曼是排名第一的國際暢銷書作者,書名:“個人的MBA:掌握企業的藝術”,還有即將出版的新書“在最初20小時:是掌握學習任何東西最重要的階段。”
 
喬許專精在教導各界人士如何掌握實用的知識和技能。在他的演講中,他提到到他的第一個孩子是如何啟發他使用一種全新的方式來學習新的東西。
 
Josh Kaufman is the author of the #1 international bestseller, 'The Personal MBA: Master the Art of Business', as well as the upcoming book 'The First 20 Hours: Mastering the Toughest Part of Learning Anything'. 
 
Josh specializes in teaching people from all walks of life how to master practical knowledge and skills. 
In his talk, he talks about how having his first child inspired him to approach learning new things in a whole new way.
 
 
 
0:11Two year ago, my life changed forever.
0:16My wife Kelsey and I
0:19welcomed our daughter Lela into the world.
0:23Now, becoming a parent is an amazing experience.
0:27Your whole world changes over night.
0:30And all of your priorities change immediately.
0:33So fast that it makes it really difficult to process sometimes.
0:39Now, you also have to learn a tremendous amount about being a parent
0:43like, for example, how to dress your child.
0:46(Laughter)
0:47This was new to me.
0:50This is an actual outfit, I thought this was a good idea.
0:53And even Lela knows that it's not a good idea. (Laughter)
0:59So there is so much to learn and so much craziness all at once.
1:04And to add to the craziness, Kelsey and I both work from home,
1:08we're entrepreneurs, we run our own businesses.
1:11So, Kelsey develops courses online for yoga teachers.
1:16I'm an author.
1:18And so, I'm working from home, Kelsey's working from home.
1:20We have an infant and we're trying to make sure
1:23that everything gets done that needs done.
1:26And life is really, really busy.
1:32And a couple of weeks into this amazing experience,
1:36when the sleep deprivation really kicked in,
1:40like around week eight,
1:42I had this thought, and it was the same thought
1:45that parents across the ages, internationally,
1:49everybody has had this thought, which is:
1:52I am never going to have free time ever again.
1:58(Laughter)
1:59Somebody said it's true.
2:02It's not exactly true,
2:05but it feels really, really true in that moment.
2:09And this was really disconcerning to me,
2:12because one of the things that I enjoy
2:15more than anything else is learning new things.
2:19Getting curious about something and diving in
2:22and fiddling around and learning through trial and error.
2:25And eventually becoming pretty good at something.
2:28And without this free time,
2:32I didn't know how I was ever going to do that ever again.
2:36And so, I'm a big geek,
2:38I want to keep learning things, I want to keep growing.
2:42And so what I've decided to do was,
2:45go to the library, and go to the bookstore,
2:47and look at what research says about
2:49how we learn and how we learn quickly.
2:53And I read a bunch of books, I read a bunch of websites.
2:56And tried to answer this question,
2:59how long does it take to acquire a new skill?
3:03You know what I found?
3:0510,000 hours!
3:09Anybody ever heard this?
3:11It takes 10,000 hours. If you want to learn something new,
3:14if you want to be good at it,
3:15it's going to take 10,000 hours to get there.
3:17And I read this in book after book, in website after website.
3:21And my mental experience of reading all of this stuff was like:
3:28No!!
3:30I don't have time! I don't have 10,000 hours.
3:34I am never going to be able to learn anything new.
3:39Ever again. (Laughter)
3:42But that's not true.
3:43So, 10,000 hours, just to give you a rough order of magnitude,
3:4610,000 hours is a full-time job for five years.
3:52That's a long time.
3:54And we've all had the experience of learning something new,
3:56and it didn't take us anywhere close to that amount of time, right?
4:00So, what's up? There's something kinda funky going on here.
4:03What the research says and what we expect, and have experiences,
4:07they don't match up.
4:09And what I found, here's the wrinkle:
4:12The 10,000 hour rule came out of studies of expert-level performance.
4:19There's a professor at Florida State University,
4:22his name is K. Anders Ericsson.
4:24He is the originator of the 10,00 hour rule.
4:26And where that came from is, he studied professional athletes,
4:31world class musicians, chess grand masters.
4:35All of this ultra competitive folks in ultra-high performing fields.
4:40And he tried to figure out how long does it take
4:43to get to the top of those kinds of fields.
4:46And what he found is, the more deliberate practice,
4:49the more time that those individuals spend
4:52practicing the elements of whatever it is that they do,
4:55the more time you spend, the better you get.
4:57And the folks at the tippy top of their fields
5:00put in around 10,000 hours of practice.
5:05Now, we were talking about the game of telephone a little bit earlier.
5:09Here's what happened:
5:11an author by the name of Malcolm Gladwell
5:13wrote a book in 2007 called "Outliers: The Story of Success",
5:17and the central piece of that book was the 10,000 hour rule.
5:21Practice a lot, practice well, and you will do extremely well,
5:25you will reach the top of your field.
5:27So, the message,
5:29what Dr. Ericsson was actually saying is,
5:32it takes 10,000 hours to get at the top of an ultra competitive field
5:37in a very narrow subject, that's what that means.
5:41But here's what happened: ever since Outliers came out,
5:45immediately came out, reached the top of best seller lists,
5:47stayed there for three solid months.
5:50All of a sudden the 10,000 hour rule was everywhere.
5:54And a society-wide game of telephone started to be played.
6:00So this message, it takes 10,000 hours to reach the top of an ultra competitive field,
6:04became, it takes 10,000 hours to become an expert at something,
6:09which became,
6:11it takes 10,000 hours to become good at something,
6:15which became,
6:17it takes 10,000 hours to learn something.
6:21But that last statement, it takes 10,000 hours to learn something,
6:25is not true. It's not true.
6:28So, what the research actually says --
6:33I spent a lot of time here at the CSU library
6:36in the cognitive psychology stacks 'cause I'm a geek.
6:39And when you actually look at the studies of skill acquisition,
6:44you see over and over a graph like this.
6:48Now, researchers, whether they're studying a motor skill,
6:51something you do physically or a mental skill,
6:54they like to study things that they can time.
6:57'Cause you can quantify that, right?
6:59So, they'll give research participants a little task,
7:02something that requires physical arrangement,
7:04or something that requires learning a little mental trick,
7:08and they'll time how long a participant takes to complete the skill.
7:13And here's what this graph says, when you start --
7:16so when researchers gave participants a task, it took them a really long time,
7:20'cause it was new and they were horrible.
7:23With a little bit of practice, they get better and better and better.
7:26And that early part of practice is really, really efficient.
7:30People get good at things with just a little bit of practice.
7:36Now, what's interesting to note is that,
7:39for skills that we want to learn for ourselves,
7:42we don't care so much about time, right?
7:45We just care about how good we are, whatever good happens to mean.
7:49So if we relabel performance time to how good you are,
7:54the graph flips, and you get his famous and widely known,
7:59this is the learning curve.
8:01And the story of the learning curve is when you start,
8:03you're grossly incompetent and you know it, right?
8:06(Laughter)
8:08With a little bit of practice, you get really good, really quick.
8:11So that early level of improvement is really fast.
8:15And then at a certain point you reach a plateau,
8:18and the subsequent games become much harder to get,
8:21they take more time to get.
8:24Now, my question is, I want that, right?
8:28How long does it take from starting something
8:31and being grossly incompetent and knowing it
8:35to being reasonably good?
8:37In hopefully, as short a period of time as possible.
8:42So, how long does that take?
8:44Here's what my research says: 20 hours.
8:49That's it. You can go from knowing nothing
8:53about any skill that you can think of.
8:55Want to learn a language? Want to learn how to draw?
8:59Want to learn how to juggle flaming chainsaws?
9:02(Laughter)
9:03If you put 20 hours of focused deliberate practice into that thing,
9:08you will be astounded.
9:10Astounded at how good you are.
9:1420 hours is doable,
9:15that's about 45 minutes a day for about a month.
9:19Even skipping a couple days, here and there.
9:2220 hours isn't that hard to accumulate.
9:25Now, there's a method to doing this.
9:28Because it's not like you can just start fiddling around for about 20 hours
9:31and expect these massive improvements.
9:33There's a way to practice intelligently.
9:35There's a way to practice efficiently,
9:37that will make sure that you invest those 20 hours
9:41in the most effective way that you possibly can.
9:43And here's the method, it applies to anything:
9:47The first is to deconstruct the skill.
9:51Decide exactly what you want to be able to do when you're done,
9:56and then look into the skill and break it down into smaller pieces.
10:02Most of the things that we think of as skills
10:06are actually big bundles of skills that require all sorts of different things.
10:10The more you can break apart the skill,
10:14the more you're able to decide,
10:16what are the parts of this skill that would actually help me
10:18get to what I want?
10:21And then you can practice those first.
10:23And if you practice the most important things first,
10:25you'll be able to improve your performance
10:28in the least amount of time possible.
10:31The second is, learn enough to self correct.
10:34So, get three to five resources about what it is you're trying to learn.
10:38Could be book, could be DVDs, could be courses, could be anything.
10:43But don't use those as a way to procrastinate on practice.
10:48I know I do this, right?
10:50Get like 20 books about the topic, like,
10:52"I'm going to start learning how to program a computer
10:55when I complete these 20 books".
10:57No. That's procrastination.
11:00What you want to do is learn just enough
11:04that you can actually practice
11:05and self correct or self edit as you practice.
11:10So the learning becomes a way of getting better
11:13at noticing when you're making a mistake
11:16and then doing something a little different.
11:19The third is to remove barriers to practice.
11:24Distractions, television, internet.
11:26All of these things that get in the way
11:29of you actually sitting down and doing the work.
11:33And the more you're able to use just a little bit of willpower
11:36to remove the distractions that are keeping you from practicing,
11:39the more likely you are to actually sit down and practice, right?
11:46And the fourth is to practice for at least 20 hours.
11:51Now, most skills have what I call a frustration barrier.
11:54You know, the grossly-incompetent- and-knowing-it part?
11:58That's really, really frustrating. We don't like to feel stupid.
12:02And feeling stupid is a barrier to us actually sitting down and doing the work.
12:07So, by pre-committing to practicing whatever it is that you want to do
12:11for at least 20 hours,
12:14you will be able to overcome that initial frustration barrier
12:18and stick with the practice long enough to actually reap the rewards.
12:23That's it! It's not rocket science.
12:25Four very simple steps that you can use to learn anything.
12:31Now, this is easy to talk about in theory,
12:35but it's more fun to talk about in practice.
12:37So one of the things that I've wanted to learn how to do for a long time
12:41is play the ukulele.
12:44Has anybody seen Jake Shimabukuro's TEDTalk
12:47where he plays the ukulele and makes it sound like --
12:50he's like a ukulele god.
12:52It's amazing.
12:54I saw it, I was like, "That is so cool!"
12:57It's such a neat instrument. I would really like to learn how to play.
13:01And so I decided that to test this theory
13:03I wanted to put 20 hours into practicing ukulele
13:07and see where it got.
13:09And so the first thing about playing the ukulele is,
13:13in order to practice, you have to have one, right?
13:17So, I got an ukulele and -- My lovely assistant?
13:21(Laughter)
13:24Thank you sir. I think I need the chord here.
13:31It's not just an ukulele, it's an electric ukulele. (Laughter)
13:35Yeah.
13:40So, the first couple hours are just like the first couple hours of anything.
13:45You have to get the tools that you are using to practice.
13:48You have to make sure they're available.
13:50My ukulele didn't come with strings attached.
13:52I had to figure out how to put those on.
13:54Like, that's kind of important, right?
13:56And learning how to tune, learning how to make sure
13:58that all of the things that need to be done
14:00in order to start practicing get done, right?
14:04Now, one of the things when I was ready to actually start practicing
14:11was I looked in online databases and songbooks for how to play songs.
14:15And they say, okay, ukuleles, you can play more than one string at a time,
14:19so you can play chords, that's cool,
14:20you are accompanying yourself, yay you. (Laughter)
14:24And when I started looking at songs,
14:28I had an ukulele chord book that had like hundreds of chords.
14:32Looking at this and "Wow, that's intimidating".
14:35But when you look at the actual songs,
14:37you see the same chords over and over, right?
14:42As it turns out, playing the ukulele is kind of like doing anything,
14:46There's a very small set of things that are really important
14:49and techniques that you'll use all the time.
14:52And in most songs you'll use four, maybe five chords,
14:58and that's it, that's the song.
15:00You don't have to know hundreds, as long as you know the four or the five.
15:04So, while I was doing my research,
15:06I found a wonderful little medley of pop songs
15:11by a band called Axis of Awesome. (Whistles)
15:16-- Somebody knows it. --
15:19And what Axis of Awesome says is that you can learn,
15:23or you can play pretty much any pop song of the past five decades,
15:27if you know four chords,
15:28and those chords are G, D, Em and C.
15:33Four chords pump out every pop song ever, right?
15:37So I thought, this is cool!
15:39I would like to play every pop song ever. (Laughter)
15:42So, that was the first song I decided to learn,
15:45and I would like to actually share it with you. Ready?
15:49(Applause) Alright.
15:51(Music)
16:03(Singing) Just a small town girl,
16:06living in a lonely world,
16:08she took the midnight train going anywhere.
16:14I heard that you settled down, (Laughter)
16:18that you found a girl,
16:21that you're married now.
16:25Every night in my dreams (Laughter)
16:27I see you, I feel you,
16:30that is how I know you go on. (Laughter)
16:36I won't hesitate no more, no more. It cannot wait, I'm yours.
16:42'Cause you were amazing, we did amazing things.
16:47If I could, then I would, I'd go wherever you will --
16:52Can you feel the love tonight. (Laughter)
16:58I can't live with or without you.
17:03When I find myself --
17:05When I find myself in times of trouble, mother Mary comes to me,
17:07Sometimes I feel like I don't have partner. No woman, no cry.
17:11Yeah mama, this surely is a dream.
17:13I come from a land down under. (Laughter)
17:15Once a jolly swagman camped by a billabong.
17:18Hey, I just met you, and this is crazy, (Laughter)
17:22but here's my number, so call me
17:26Hey sexy lady, op, op, op, op, oppan gangnam style. (Laughter)
17:30It's time to say goodbye.
17:35Closing time, every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end.
17:45(Singing and music ends) (Applause)
17:56Thank you, thank you.
18:03I love that song. (Laughter)
18:07And I have a secret to share with you.
18:10So, by playing that song for you,
18:14I just hit my twentieth hour of practicing the ukulele.
18:19(Applause) Thank you.
18:24And so it's amazing, pretty much anything that you can think of,
18:28what do you want to do.
18:30The major barrier to learn something new is not intellectual,
18:35it's not the process of you learning a bunch of little tips or tricks or things.
18:40The major barrier's emotional. We're scared.
18:44Feeling stupid doesn't feel good,
18:47in the beginning of learning anything new
18:49you feel really stupid.
18:51So the major barrier's not intellectual, it's emotional.
18:55But put 20 hours into anything.
18:58It doesn't matter. What do you want to learn?
19:01Do you want to learn a language? Want to learn how to cook?
19:04Want to learn how to draw?
19:07What turns you on? What lights you up?
19:10Go out and do that thing. It only takes 20 hours.
19:14Have fun.
19:16(Applause)
 
 
 
0:09嗨,大家好
0:11兩年前,我的人生永遠改變了
0:16因為,我和太太凱爾西
0:19要一起迎接女兒利娜到來
0:23當父母,真是一個很神奇的經驗
0:27你的世界會在一個晚上 就變得完全不一樣
0:30所有人生的優先次序 也會馬上改變
0:33有些時候,我們因為變化來得太快而難以適應
0:39你必須學習超多當父母要知道的事情
0:43像是要如何替你的孩子打扮
0:46(笑聲)
0:47這對我來說很新鮮
0:50這裡有個實際示範,我想這樣配搭還不錯
0:53可是,連利娜都覺得不太妙(笑聲)
0:59太多事情要學,而同時也有太多的笑料在其中
1:04我跟凱爾西都在家裡面工作
1:08我們是企業家,發展自己的事業
1:11凱爾西在網上為瑜珈導師發展課程
1:16而我,是一名作家
1:18我在家裡工作,凱爾西也是
1:20我們有一個小寶寶,因此,我們嘗試
1:23讓每一件事情都可以循序完成
1:26然而,生活實在、實在太忙碌了
1:32我們有好幾週都過這種驚人的生活
1:36睡眠不足時更是惱人
1:40這樣過了八個星期
1:42我有了一個想法
1:44就和全世界各個年齡層父母 擁有的想法都一樣
1:49每個人都曾這樣想:
1:52我再也不會有自己的時間了 永遠都別想了
1:58(笑聲)
1:59某些人說這是真的
2:02但它又不完全正確
2:05可是當時感覺真的是那樣
2:09這讓我很頭痛
2:12因為我尤其喜歡
2:15學習新事物
2:19常常對一些事物感到好奇 接著深入研究、耗上大把光陰
2:23在嘗試和從錯誤中學習
2:25最終就會變得擅長某件事
2:28沒有了這些空閒時間
2:32我不確定自己什麼時候還能這樣玩
2:36我是個大怪人
2:38我很希望可以繼續學習,繼續成長
2:42所以我決定要
2:45去圖書館和逛書店
2:47找調查研究來看
2:49看怎麼可以學得更快、更好
2:53我看了一大堆的書和網頁
2:56嘗試解答這個問題
2:59要多長時間才能學會一項新技能?
3:03你猜我發現了什麼?
3:05一萬小時呢!
3:09有人聽過嗎?
3:11要花一萬小時 如果你想學新的事物
3:14如果你想變得專精
3:15那你需要一萬小時才能實現
3:17這個理論出現在一本又一本的書裡 一個又一個的網頁中
3:21然而,我的腦袋對這些東西說
3:28不!!!
3:30我沒有那麼多時間!我沒有一萬小時!
3:34我永遠不能再學新東西了
3:39這輩子都別想了 (笑聲)
3:42還好,這不是真的
3:43一萬小時,給你個粗略概念
3:46一萬小時等於是 一份全職工作做五年
3:52這是一段很長的時間
3:54我們都有學習新事物的經驗
3:56根本不需要那麼久吧?
4:00所以呢,我在此要與你分享新發現
4:03研究結果和我們的期待與經驗
4:07統統都對不上
4:09因此我有了新發現,那就是:
4:12一萬小時定律是出自 達到專家等級的研究
4:19那是佛羅理達州大學
4:22艾瑞克森教授 (K. Anders Ericsson) 的理論
4:24他是一萬小時定律的創始人
4:26理論來自他研究專業的運動員
4:31世界級的音樂家和棋王
4:35所有這些都是 頂級比賽的頂級專家
4:40他嘗試找出要花多長時間
4:43才能變成這些領域的專家
4:46他發現越多盡心盡力的鍛鍊
4:49花更多的時間
4:52來鍛鍊所需的元素
4:55你花越多時間,就能做得越好
4:57那些在各個領域的佼佼者
5:00花了大約一萬小時練習
5:05現在,我們說說一個早前的傳話遊戲
5:09事情的經過是:
5:11作家麥爾坎•葛拉威爾
5:13在 2007 年寫了一本書 《異數:超凡與平凡的界線在哪裡?》
5:17這本書的重點就是 介紹一萬小時定律
5:21多多練習,好好練習,你就會做到極致
5:25成為該領域中的專家
5:27因此艾瑞克森博士
5:29傳達的訊息其實是
5:32我們需要花一萬小時 才能成為業界的專家
5:37這是指在一個很專門的領域
5:41結果是:《異數》一出版
5:45馬上銷售一空,成為排行榜第一名
5:47穩座寶座整整三個月
5:50突然間,一萬小時定律廣為流傳
5:54於是,整個社會都開始傳這樣的訊息
6:00後來一萬小時就可以 在專業領域中傲視群倫
6:04變成一萬小時就能 成為某件事的專家
6:09然後變成了
6:11花一萬小時就能擅長某件事
6:15然後又變成了
6:17學新東西要花一萬小時
6:21但那最後一句 學新東西要花一萬小時
6:25那並不是真的,絕對不是真的
6:28到底原來的調查研究想說明什麼?
6:33我在加州州立大學圖書館 花了很多時間
6:36埋首在認知心理學書堆中 因為我是個怪人
6:39當你專注在掌握技能的研究上
6:44你會一次又一次地 看見這樣的圖像
6:48研究人員發現 無論是在學運動技能
6:51一些生理或心理上的技能
6:54人們喜歡學習 能夠估算時間的事物
6:57因為你能量化,對吧?
6:59因此,他們會給研究受試者 一些簡單的任務
7:02一些需要肢體協調
7:04或是一些需要學點小訣竅的事情
7:08研究員會計算他們需要 多長時間去學習
7:13這一幅圖顯示了,當你開始…
7:16當研究員給參加者一個任務 他們得花一段很長的時間
7:20因為全新的事物讓他們感到懼怕
7:23不過,只需稍加練習,他們就能越做越好
7:26在早期練習尤其有效
7:30只要經過一點練習,就能變得精通
7:36我想跟你們分享,有趣的是
7:39如果是為自己而學的技能
7:42時間根本不是問題,對吧?
7:45我們只會關心怎樣可以做得更好 不管所謂的好是指多好
7:49如果我們將完成時間 更換成熟練度
7:54曲線會向上攀升,你會出名,變得廣為人知
7:59這就是學習曲線
8:01學習曲線即是當你開始時
8:03你知道那會亂七八糟、一塌糊塗
8:06(笑聲)
8:08不過,經過一些訓練後 你就會有明顯的改善
8:11因此早期的進展特別明顯
8:15直到你到達學習的高原期
8:18此後,這個遊戲會變得難多了
8:21需要花更多時間才能進步
8:24問題來了,那是我的目的,對吧?
8:28到底,我們要花多長時間 才能從開始學習
8:31到零零落落的表現 再到熟悉
8:35最後到能登大雅之堂?
8:37當然, 我們都希望越少時間越好
8:42那麼,是多久呢?
8:44我的研究結果是:20 小時
8:49從完全不懂到
8:53學會任何你想學的
8:55想學新語言? 想學畫畫?
8:59想學火炬雜耍?
9:02(笑聲)
9:03如果你花 20 小時專注地仔細練習
9:08你會大吃一驚
9:10訝異你也可以做得那麼好
9:1420 小時是可行的
9:15每天約 45 分鐘,只要一個月
9:19即使三不五時休個幾天
9:22累積 20 小時應該不會太難吧
9:25現在終於有這個方法能辦到
9:28因為那並非 你只要開始耗上 20 小時
9:31就能期待有明顯的進步
9:33我們有個聰明的練習方法
9:35可以有效地練習
9:37並能確保你把那 20 小時
9:41用在你能達到 且最有成效的方式上
9:43方法如下,任何事都適用:
9:47首先,你要拆解那項技能
9:51決定你要達到什麼程度
9:56接著了解那技能 並把它拆解成小片段
10:02我們想到技術時最常想到的是
10:06大部分的技術都需要 各種不同的元素
10:10你越能把它拆解開來
10:14就越能讓你決定
10:16要做到這項技能的哪些部分
10:18才能幫我達成想要的目標?
10:21如此一來,你就能先練習那些部分
10:23如果你開始就先練習最關鍵的部分
10:26你就能用最短的時間
10:28讓你的表現有所進展
10:31第二,學習到你能自行修正的程度
10:34拿著三、五樣你想學習事物的資源
10:38可以是一本書、影片、課程,任何東西
10:43但是,不要讓那些東西耽擱了練習
10:48我知道自己在什麼,對吧?
10:50像收集 20 本同一題材的書
10:52「我打算學習如何寫電腦程式
10:55但要看完這 20 本書後才開始。」
10:57不!這就是在耽擱你了
11:00你想做的就是學習到能夠
11:04你可以練習
11:05並在練習中能自我修正、自行編輯
11:10因此,學習變成一種方式
11:12讓你能更擅於發現自己犯的錯
11:16並做出一些改變
11:19第三,消除練習的阻礙
11:24像是讓你分心的事情、電視、網路
11:26所有這些東西都會打亂
11:29你正要坐下來工作的情緒
11:33你越能用多一丁點的意志力
11:36清除讓你無法練習、分心的事物
11:39那麼, 你就越能真正地坐下來練習
11:46第四,至少練習 20 小時
11:51大部分的技能都有 一道令人沮喪的障礙
11:54那稱為非常了解卻笨手笨腳的部分
11:58那真是太令人沮喪 沒有人希望看起來很蠢
12:02感覺很蠢是 我們認真坐下來進行的一道障礙
12:07因此,無論你想要學什麼
12:11只需先練習至少 20 小時
12:14你就可以克服那令人沮喪的阻礙
12:18並堅持練習到能收獲成果的程度
12:23就是這樣!這不像火箭科技那麼複雜
12:25你只需要有四個簡單的步驟 就能學任何東西
12:31談理論面很簡單
12:35但是談實務面就有趣多了
12:37我想學一樣東西很久了
12:41就是彈奏烏克麗麗
12:44你們看過傑克•島袋的 TED 演說嗎?
12:47當他彈起烏克麗麗簡直
12:50就像是烏克麗麗的神
12:52真是太神奇了!
12:54我看了心想:「天啊!那真酷!」
12:57這是如此美妙的樂器 我實在希望可以學會如何演奏
13:01於是,我決定嘗試這個理論
13:03我計畫花 20 小時學烏克麗麗
13:07然後,看可以學得如何
13:09要學彈奏烏克麗麗,為了能練習
13:13首先你必須要有一把,對吧?
13:17因此,我拿了一把烏克麗麗和… 我可愛的助手呢?
13:21(笑聲)
13:24謝謝你 我想我需要一條電線
13:31這不只是一把烏克麗麗 這還是一把電子的烏克麗麗(笑聲)
13:35是啊
13:40前兩個小時練習時就像 每件事的前兩小時一樣
13:45你得先有練習時需要的工具
13:48你得確保樂器沒有問題
13:50我的烏克麗麗沒有裝上弦線
13:52我得想辦法把它裝好
13:54畢竟那也蠻重要的吧?
13:56學習如何調音,和如何確定
13:58一切該做的事都準備就緒
14:00就可以開始練習了
14:04在我真的準備好開始練習時
14:11為了學怎麼演奏曲目 我先看了網路上的資料和歌本
14:15他們說,你可以同時彈奏 烏克麗麗的多條弦
14:19你就能彈奏和音,酷喔!
14:20你為自己伴奏,嘿耶(大笑)
14:24當我開始看曲目時
14:28我有一本烏克麗麗和弦書 裡面有幾百個和弦
14:32看這個:「哇嗚!那還真嚇人!」
14:35不過,當你觀察真的歌曲時
14:37會發現其實一直重覆某些和弦吧?
14:42因此,彈奏烏克麗麗就像做任何事情一樣
14:46有一些很重要的東西在裡面
14:49還有一些將來會常用到的技巧
14:52大部分的曲目中 你都可以用四、五個和弦就好
14:58這就夠了,就會是一首歌
15:00你不需要知道上百個 只需要知道那四到五個
15:04所以,當我開始研究
15:06我發現一首美妙的流行歌小組曲
15:11來自厲害軸心樂隊 (哨音)
15:16──有人認識他們──
15:19厲害軸心樂隊說你可以學
15:23或你可以演奏許多 過去五十年的任何流行歌曲
15:27只要你知道四個和弦
15:28那就是 G、D、Em 和 C 調
15:33四個音調就能彈奏每一首流行歌曲
15:37我想這真是酷!
15:39我希望就此能夠彈奏每一首流行曲(笑聲)
15:42這是第一首我決定要學的歌
15:45我誠摯地獻給各位,準備好了嗎?
15:49(掌聲)好的
15:51(音樂)
16:03(唱歌)只是個平凡的小鎮姑娘
16:06住在孤單的世界
16:08她坐上了深夜的火車 不知要去哪兒
16:14我聽說你已經安定下來了(笑聲)
16:18找到了一個女孩
16:21現在已經結婚了
16:25每晚在我夢裡(笑聲)
16:27我都看見你,感覺到你
16:30因此我知道你還在(笑聲)
16:36我不再遲疑,不再遲疑 不能再等了,我是你的
16:42因為你很棒 我們在一起時做了很棒的事
16:47如果可以,我會與你浪跡天涯
16:52今晚,你能感受到愛嗎?(笑聲)
16:58我不能活下去 不管有或沒有你
17:03當我發現自己
17:05發現自己有麻煩的時候 聖母瑪利亞會來安撫我
17:07有些時候,我覺得就像沒有任何伴侶 沒有女性,沒有哭泣
17:11是的,媽媽,這只是我的夢
17:13我來自南方的某塊土地(笑聲)
17:15當一個高興的流浪漢在死水潭邊露宿
17:18嗨,我就遇上你,這真是難以想像(笑聲)
17:22不過,這是我的手機號碼,要找我喔!
17:24嗨!性感小姐,噢,噢,噢,噢,噢 江南 style(笑聲)
17:30是說再見的時候了
17:35一扇門關了,就會有另一扇門開著
17:45(歌聲和音樂結束)(掌聲)
17:56謝謝,謝謝
18:03我喜歡這首歌(笑聲)
18:07我還有一個祕密要告訴你
18:10剛剛為各位唱這一首歌的時候
18:14我正好完成練習烏克麗麗的第 20 個小時
18:19(掌聲)謝謝
18:24幾乎對你想的到 所有感興趣的事來說
18:28這都很驚人
18:30學習新事物的最大障礙 不是你有多聰明
18:35也不是過程中需要 一大堆的技巧和祕訣
18:40而是要克服我們的情緒、我們的恐懼
18:44覺得自己很蠢的感覺不太好
18:47開始學任何新事物的時候
18:49你都會自然覺得自己很笨
18:51主要的障礙不是我們的智能,而是情緒
18:55但是,只要花 20 小時在任何事情上
18:58就可以解決問題 你想要學什麼?
19:01想要學一種語言?學習烹飪?
19:04或者是繪畫?
19:07對什麼有興趣?什麼讓你興奮?
19:10出門去學吧,只要 20 小時而已
19:14好好享受!
 

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